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Below are the 20 most recent journal entries recorded in Paul's LiveJournal:

    [ << Previous 20 ]
    Tuesday, January 27th, 2015
    8:16 am
    Wheat train spotted at Albany


    We like trains.

    When we called into the port of Albany on the Astor last Thursday we noticed many large trucks entering the busy grain storage area dockside to deliver the wheat harvest from surrounding agricultural areas maybe hundreds of kilometers away. You can see one in the top-left image. We also saw trains doing the same sort of thing. Jill counted 57 wagons attached to the twin locomotives in the photos above. The lead loco was 016 Neendaling backed up by 017 Lake Biddy. Both are named for Western Australian wheat growing areas.

    © MMXV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



    webanalytics

    Monday, January 26th, 2015
    9:12 am
    Three cheers for Dog Rock on Australia Day


    Doing Dog Rock for Australia

    To be truthful the above images weren't taken at Dog Rock in Albany on Australia Day, which is today. They were taken last Thursday when our cruise ship Astor called into the southern port for a day. Taking a cue from the politically malleable Australian media, the pics were embargoed until today.

    I can vaguely remember visiting Dog Rock with my parents when I was about three years old, and I can more clearly remember my Mum scolding my Dad when he let me stand on his lap and steer our little black Hillman Minx car during that same holiday. Albany has changed a lot since those days. For example there's now an ugly group of shops and a supermarket behind where the three photos were taken. But the solid granite Dog Rock stands defiantly where it has been since long before our human ancestors began roaming the planet. I'm pretty certain it will still exist long after our species becomes extinct. Three cheers for Dog Rock.

    © MMXV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



    webanalytics

    Sunday, January 25th, 2015
    10:22 am
    Yellow-throated miners at Esperance


    Yellow-throated miners gave us a thrill.

    When we were on our recent cruise along the south coast naturally we were on the lookout for native birds. When we went ashore at Esperance on 25 January one of the first species we noticed were Yellow-throated miners (Manorina flavigula). We were unfamiliar with them and had to check our bird book when we came home. The top photo is of three hungry fledgelings and the bottom two images are of one of the parents foraging for them. Every three or four minutes there would be a commotion amongst the youngsters as one of them got lucky. There seemed to be quite a lot of these birds about the town. Jill gets the credit for all three photos.

    © MMXV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



    webanalytics

    Saturday, January 24th, 2015
    3:10 pm
    Home from our second cruise on the Astor


    The Astor is a happy ship.

    Our short five-night cruise along the southwest coast aboard the Astor concluded at Fremantle this morning. By 9am we'd eaten a shipboard breakfast, stepped ashore, collected our luggage and were being driven home by our son Glen. As I write this at 3pm the next load of passengers will be getting aboard. Even though our feet have been replanted ashore, six hours later Jill and I are both still experiencing peculiar sensations with our balance.

    The first pair of images were taken this morning as the ship approached the Fremantle Passenger terminal. Jill was still wearing her Travelcalm on her wrist while shielding her eyes in the bright sunlight. The Captain and his deputy carefully nudged the vessel towards the wharf while a Freo pilot fiddled with what looked like an iPad. Once the Astor was safely berthed the cheerful crew started moving 600 passengers' baggage ashore so efficiently that the entire job was completed in fifteen minutes. In fact all of the crew we encountered on our trip seemed equally enthusiastic, no matter how humble the task. The signal flags being hoisted at top-right might have said, "This is is a happy ship." because it is.

    © MMXV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



    webanalytics

    Friday, January 23rd, 2015
    3:22 pm
    Teak deck is tougher than a camera lens


    Last images for 300mm.

    The photo of a flying fish in the Great Southern Ocean was taken by myself late this morning as our ship Astor was approaching Cape Leeuwin. It was the final one taken with our ever-reliable 300mm Nikon zoom lens. Alas it’s status changed soon after. I tripped coming down a flight of steps and as it struck the teak deck it was snapped off its camera mount as clean as a carrot. The camera appears okay. We tested it with another lens, however the 300mm lens is totally cactus. Jill reckons it was time to buy a better lens anyway. What a perfect wife she is. The bottom images were taken by Jill with the long lens at Albany yesterday before I broke it. The left image is of the same racehorse goanna which was featured in yesterday’s blog entry. The image at bottom right is of a King’s skink attracted by the smell of some fresh apples we were eating.

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by registered LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.
    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my Rottnest essays: Btn_red_30x30
    Even better, click here to view them on ‘The Shelf.’

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!





    Site Meter


    Thursday, January 22nd, 2015
    6:26 pm
    Goanna greetings from Albany


    Goanna greetings.

    ‘Twas a long and tiring day that Jill and I spent today wandering about the native bushland and nearby environs associated with Mount Clarence in Albany. Fifteen kilometers all up (and down). The highlight of the visit was meeting with a beautiful young racehorse goanna which allowed us to get very close with the cameras to take some terrific pictures, three of which appear above. Our ship the Astor doesn’t sail until 10pm this evening, by which time I expect I will be asleep. I can’t speak for the goanna.

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by registered LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.
    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my Rottnest essays: Btn_red_30x30
    Even better, click here to view them on ‘The Shelf.’

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!





    Site Meter


    Wednesday, January 21st, 2015
    4:19 pm
    A day in Esperance


    A day in Esperance.

    Breakfast was earlier this morning to allow more time for disembarking of passengers into a couple of lifeboats for conveyance from the anchored ship Astor to the shoreside port of Esperance on the southern edge of Oz. The operation went smoothly enough and Jill and I soon were walking about the town with our cameras. The place had changed a lot since our last visit over 30 years ago. What place hasn’t? We spent a interesting hour in their museum looking at stuff. Among their exhibits was a fair collection of space junk collected after NASA’s Skylab crashed in the late 1970s. With the temperature rising we then climbed a very steep hill to check out the magnificent views of the Recherche Archipelago before returning to the ship very hot and sweaty.

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by registered LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.
    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my Rottnest essays: Btn_red_30x30
    Even better, click here to view them on ‘The Shelf.’

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!





    Site Meter


    Tuesday, January 20th, 2015
    3:09 pm
    Cruising along the south coast

    The good ship Astor is travelling eastward in sight of the south coast. The voyage has so far been smooth enough for Jill and me since we ate a couple of bacon sandwiches for breakfast. A plate of Danish pastries is soon expected for our morning tea. Yum! Then comes lunch at 12 - I’m sure there will be more food than we and the other 600 passengers can eat. Jill has a phone connection to the mainland, but the iMac modem hasn’t. Arghhhh! We were about half way between Cape Leeuwin and Albany when I started this entry. Lunch is over and we are about to have afternoon tea.


    Off the south coast thinking of bacon sandwiches.

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by registered LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.
    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my Rottnest essays: Btn_red_30x30
    Even better, click here to view them on ‘The Shelf.’

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!





    Site Meter


    Monday, January 19th, 2015
    6:20 am
    Fremantle view in a southerly direction

    The image below is a shipboard view of Fremantle taken thirteen months ago as we departed on an all-too-short southerly coastal cruise aboard the Astor. I wouldn't mind doing that adventure again. I notice the ship is back in Freo today.


    A southerly view of Freo.

    Many of the buildings in the photo are quite old by local standards. The limestone structure with the windowless walls is easily recognisable as 'The Roundhouse', a former colonial prison notable as Western Australia's oldest surviving bit of colonial architecture. It was completed on 18 January 1831. Hey, that makes it 184 years old yesterday. I've mentioned the iconic edifice several times during the years of writing this blog. Beyond the Roundhouse on the right can be seen some of the vessels in the Fremantle Fishing Boat Harbour.

    © MMXV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



    webanalytics

    Sunday, January 18th, 2015
    10:20 am
    Blue is for boys


    Luke (top) and Tim (bottom) will both soon be fathers.

    The excitement is mounting. Our sons Luke and Tim are looking forward very much to the arrival of their sons in a few months time. So too are Jill and I because they will become our first grandchildren. All of Luke and Tim's brothers and sisters are excited because they will become their aunties and uncles. The only advice I would offer is for our two sons and their wonderful wives Crystal and Claire is to make sure they take plenty of photos as their children and relatives grow. It's true that the older you become, the faster the years seem to have flashed by. Luke was our first son born in 1978. That's him in the top two images. Tim was born as our fourth child in 1986, and he's represented in the bottom two images. Can you find a knob of polony sausage in one of the photos. LOL! Jill and I unreservedly love all our nine children and their partners.

    © MMXV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



    webanalytics

    Saturday, January 17th, 2015
    9:35 am
    A 1960s dredging flashback to Point Walter


    1960s environmental modification at Point Walter.

    Riverphiles familiar with Point Walter will notice many changes which have taken place since my father Alfred G. Weaver took these photos of dredging operations in about 1963. There used to be a narrow sandy car track along the visible shoreline. Now there is a bitumised road, a bicycle path, car parks, boat ramps, a busy cafe and toilet blocks. Furthermore there has been some serious erosion along the immediate shoreline necessitating sandbagging and the construction of retaining walls. Before the dredging, the shallows offered a rich diversity of aquatic life which included algae, fish, crabs mollusks and prawns. The environmental impact of dredging on what had been a nursery for many species was significant. Point Walter was one of my favourite after-school summer haunts when I was a kid. If you look carefully on the left side of the large image above you can see the very tall radio antenna on Wireless Hill. The antenna has long gone, but the hill and its nature reserve have also been subjected to the pressures of environmental modernisation. A couple of comparative photos taken last year at Point Walter can be seen at http://fremantlebiz.livejournal.com/2014/08/01/

    © MMXV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



    webanalytics

    Friday, January 16th, 2015
    8:19 am
    Thank goodness it's a very good Friday

    Jill and I were pleased to be woken about 5:30am this morning by an SMS message from our eldest daughter Fiona and her husband Eliott that they had safely landed at Perth airport following their honeymoon on the island of Phuket in Thailand. I admit I had anxious thoughts about Islamist terrorists, mystery plane crashes, tsunamis and rogue elephants while they were away, but I kept them to myself. Very much welcome home kids.

    There's been some more good news too. Another of our family's couples, Terry and Mel have just had the plans for a new house stamped, "APPPROVED." Yay! A hitherto unsuspected architectural technicality related to the calculated percentage of shade cast by the roof on the shortest day of each year was apparently overcome.

    On a different building adventure, any day now the concrete slab for a new house is expected to be poured for our daughter Peta and her soulmate Luke. Mucho excitement noticed with our daughter who has been taking advantage of the January sales to stock up on kitchen gadgets for her new home when it is completed, hopefully before winter.

    Pleasing too is the news that after a week of being unwell, our tabby cat Max has been showing signs of improvement. We took him to the Vet yesterday for another checkup and he's now on some different antibiotics and seemingly getting back to his old self. When I checked this morning, the pic below of him has been viewed 47,971 times since I first put it up in 2011:

    From Cats and dogs


    © MMXV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



    webanalytics

    Thursday, January 15th, 2015
    8:17 am
    Les Misérables come to town

    I went to the gym and pumped some iron while Jill and our youngest daughter Kylie went to the matinee performance of Les Misérables at the Crown Theatre in the Burswood Casino complex yesterday. Jill had bought the tickets in July last year as a birthday present for Kylie. By accounts they enjoyed the almost three hour show very much. Jill said they were sobbing appropriately by the time the final curtain came down. The girls arrived early, as Weaver folk tend to do. Here's a pic which Jill secretly snatched with her iPhone before the performance started.


    Les Misérables

    © MMXV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



    webanalytics

    Wednesday, January 14th, 2015
    9:55 am
    Free views of the Swan River


    Swan River views.

    Some of the best things in life are free, or nearly free. These days I think it requires a license to fish in the Swan River, but after that everything is free, even if the participants don't catch any fish. But as generations of fishers have often related, going fishing is often not necessarily about catching fish, but of spending quality time in quiet contemplation of the views. I guess it's similar with people on paddle boards. The latter seems to be an activity best kept to very calm conditions as existed for a woman paddler last Sunday afternoon along the lee shore of the Swan River at Attadale.

    But enjoyment of the river's splendid views is not free for everyone, as can be deduced from the earthworks taking place on a private bit of land opposite at salubrious Dalkeith. Some squillionaire has bought two or three old mansions to rip down and build an ostentatious new mega-mansion in their place. The question is whether or not it will ever be completed? There are a few unhappy examples of mega-mansion projects running out of steam in this neck of the woods. Even if it is completed, we peasants visiting the other side will still be able to enjoy our river views for free.

    © MMXV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



    webanalytics

    Tuesday, January 13th, 2015
    8:50 am
    Meaningful signage near the Attadale foreshore


    Read the signs.

    Being a good citizen I always read signs, or more specifically the intended meanings of them. The collection above were spotted on Sunday when Jill and I were strolling along the southern foreshore of the Swan River at Attadale. The meaning of the pic at top left is obviously directed at owners of sausage dogs like our friends Sharleen and Mel who have a much smaller one than the whopper depicted in the sign. The bigger the sausage dog the bigger the sausage I always say, if you know what I mean. Fortunately S & M own a small one and are of course responsible sausage dog owners. However, not every dog owed is so considerate. The sign at top right is a new one with coloured graphics of greenish dog turds to warn innocents they are entering a disgusting zone which no one in their right mind should consider taking their family for a sit-down picnic of the coming Australia Day. Some troublemaker has stuck a love heart on one of the turds and a flower symbol on the other. Also obvious in meaning is the sign at bottom left. Unnatural liaisons between dogs and cats of any type will not be tolerated and are are risk of having a red line drawn on them, even if they are both wearing a collar. Unfortunately most of the meaning has gone from the shoreside sign at bottom right. The words, "Whose estuary is it?" can barely be read.

    © MMXV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



    webanalytics

    Monday, January 12th, 2015
    7:23 am
    A band of Banded-stilts chill out on the Swan River


    A band of Banded-stilts.

    Jill and I went for a stroll along the Attadale foreshore near Alfred cove yesterday afternoon and noticed this group of Banded-stilts Cladorhynchus leucocephalus hanging out in the tidal shallows. They're named for the brown band of feathers on their lower chest. It's displayed at its distinctive best during the breeding season. In the top image they are all wading on their long legs. At lower-left the water was deeper and some had begun to swim. At lower-right they decided enough was enough and flew away, presumably to somewhere more private. Jill gets the credit for taking all three photos.

    © MMXV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



    webanalytics

    Sunday, January 11th, 2015
    8:50 am
    Big bushfire at Bullsbrook


    Bullsbrook bushfire to the north, beyond the Swan River.

    The smoke rising from a bushfire at Bullsbrook approximately 60 km north of us looked pretty serious when Jill tool the riverside pic at top-left on her iPhone about midday yesterday, it was worse when I took the other five on my Nikon four and half hours later at about 4:30pm. Media reports said the fire was raging out of control. A huge plume of smoke had been generated and was drifting westward over the Indian Ocean. This morning the overall situation is still uncertain. Apparently property damage has been minimal, but some firefighters have been injured in a vehicle accident. Here's a FESA report issued this morning about the fire's status: http://www.dfes.wa.gov.au/alerts/Pages/Alert.aspx?ItemId=12169

    © MMXV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



    webanalytics

    Saturday, January 10th, 2015
    7:25 am
    Sad news Saturday

    The lives of the despicable Islamist terrorists who initiated the murders and wounding of many Parisians at the Charlie Hebdo offices some 48 hours ago were terminated in two sieges overnight. One result was in a small village called Dammartin en Goele north east of the French capital and the other at a Jewish supermarket in the east of Paris. We watched live TV being streamed from both locations until about 9:30pm and then went to bed. Sadly this morning, we've learned that four hostages at the supermarket lost their lives and that other victims were murdered by terrorist gunshots elsewhere in Paris earlier. Now the Police are searching for a female accomplice believed to have escaped during the supermarket confusion. Further attacks involving other countries have been promised by Islamist terror-propagandists.

    On a happier note here, my wife Jill spent a couple of hours yesterday sewing up fourteen pairs of purple cotton mittens in response to an urgent appeal for volunteers by an animal rescue network in Sydney. The donated mittens are used to cover bandages on the paws of animals such as koala bears which have been burned in recent catastrophic bush fires in various states. Jill posted them off yesterday.


    Jill's mittens destined for burned Koala paws.

    If you would like to be a volunteer koala mitten sewer then visit the following website to get the details and download a pattern: http://www.ifaw.org/australia/news/koalas-sew-need-you-summer

    © MMXV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



    webanalytics

    Friday, January 9th, 2015
    7:45 am
    Winter in France, and other places


    Winter in France.

    It's currently winter in France and yesterday came news of a chilling event when Islamist terrorists invaded the Paris offices of a satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo and murdered many of its employees because of perceived insults involving Islam, in particular cartoon depictions of Mohammed. Once the gunmen had done their terrible work, which also included seriously wounding several other victims with gunshots, they escaped and 24 hours later are still on the run. My photo of a much more peaceful winter scene in France was taken when I was there in 1968.

    Meanwhile I came across a news report in The Guardian this morning that a Saudi Arabian court has sentenced a blogger whom also allegedly insulted Islam, to a fine equivalent to more than a quarter of a million dollars, ten years in prison and 1,000 lashes. The first instalment of public floggings is reportedly scheduled for today outside a mosque in Jeddah - 50 lashes a week for the next 20 weeks.

    © MMXV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



    webanalytics

    Thursday, January 8th, 2015
    7:26 am
    Fremantle port action in January 2015


    Fremantle port on Tuesday and Wednesday.

    The pic with the passenger train crossing the bridge was taken in very hazy conditions on Tuesday. Jill and I had clamored up bush covered Cantonment Hill to unsuccessfully try for some pictures of redundant freight locomotives we'd heard were being loaded onto Jumbo Shipping's vessel Fairlift. A consignment of twenty or so decrepit locos will be pressed into further service somewhere in Africa. We had better luck yesterday when conditions were much clearer. In the bottom right image you can see one of the old locos waiting to be loaded. While we were on the hill Jill took the larger image over North Wharf with Rottnest Island on the horizon. Coincidentally afterwards, we visited the Island's Fremantle office to cancel a stay we'd booked for May this year. Two grandchildren are expected to be born about the same time and Jill has become a bit clucky.

    © MMXV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



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