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Below are the 20 most recent journal entries recorded in Paul's LiveJournal:

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    Sunday, November 23rd, 2014
    6:17 am
    Execution of a nasty cactus


    Hasta la vista nasty cactus

    I can't remember where or when we acquired this nasty cactus. It has been sitting amongst some other more friendly potted plants in our back garden for at least a couple of years. Yesterday after consulting Jill I made an executive decision and executed it by the most expedient way I could think of. Sending it to landfill with our non-recyclable garbage.

    A few weeks ago I dispatched three other species of nasty cacti to a similar fate. I could have given them all to one of our neighbours. He's recently developed a passion for collecting cacti and succulents. We given him some safe ones. However he has a young toddler and I wouldn't be able to forgive myself if she came into contact with the nasties. They were all so ferocious they couldn't even be handled safely with leather gloves. We must have been out of our minds when we got them. Good riddance I say. So does our cocker spaniel Millie. She agrees Geraniums are much more child and oldster friendly.

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



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    Saturday, November 22nd, 2014
    6:34 am
    Some Ivy geranium flashbacks from 2014


    Ivy geranium flashbacks from 2014.

    You may or may not have seen these pics or something similar on Fremantlebiz before. They're from a folder I use to upload such images to Facebook sites which I happen to 'like.' One is located in Spain and is called Geraniums - Geranios. Today there are 1,885 people around the world who also 'like' this site. Language is no barrier. There's a steady trickle of photos from people of differing nationalities whom enjoy adorning their own homescapes with geraniums. I can say that many of these contributor's images are very inspiring, but don't take my word for it. Check out Geranios for yourself. The other Facebook site where I post Geranium images is our local Geranium and Pelargonium Society of Western Australia Inc. Jill and I are very pleased to be members of this venerable organisation and couldn't wish to meet a more cheerful and generous bunch of people. Their Facebook site hasn't been going very long, but just this week their 'likes' number passed the 300 mark. The specific URL for GAPSWA is https://www.facebook.com/GAPSWA?fref=ts and for Geranios is https://www.facebook.com/pages/Geraniums-Geranios/163332087056023?fref=ts Otherwise simply do a search for geraniums on Facebook.

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



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    Friday, November 21st, 2014
    7:57 am
    North Lake is topped up ready for summer


    North Lake water level looking good.

    It has been raining in these parts during the past 24 hours, which is good news for the local ephemeral freshwater lakes. On our way to somewhere else yesterday morning, Jill and I called briefly into North Lake so I could snap a pic of the impressive post-winter water level. The large image above is the result. What a difference there was compared with the bottom two images we took in March this year when the lake was almost totally devoid of water. Nevertheless, the wetlands along the Swan Coastal Plain are increasingly under threat from urban and industrial developments, and inadequate government conservation strategies.

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



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    Thursday, November 20th, 2014
    6:44 am
    Max is feeling much better - thank you


    Super Max can leap a geranium in a single bound.

    A month ago we thought our tabby cat Max was on his last legs. He'd been diagnosed with terminal lymphoma and was deteriorating fast. He became very ill. It was a very distressing time for him and our family. His debilitation progressed almost to the point of Jill and I making the final decision, but we held off and while I don't usually pray for anything, in this case tried one in my mind for my old friend. Gradually he began to improve. Was it a miracle? Well it seems to me a bit like it was. By last week Max was back to his old self. All the swelling in his lymph glands had vanished and his appetite had returned. He was even prepared to get up to some old tricks for me. Who says you can't train a cat. I wanted a pic of him leaping over a geranium for the Spanish Geranios Facebook site. Max was happy to oblige - six times back and forth in fact, until he reckoned enough was enough and departed the stage to do something more interesting. We're keeping our fingers crossed that our old friend's recovery is for the long term.

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



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    Wednesday, November 19th, 2014
    6:55 am
    Wireless Hill views - 2014, 2013 and 2008


    Wireless Hill views, November 2014 & 2013.

    I have to admit that in the photo I took last weekend of Wireless Hill viewed across the mud bank from the Attadale foreshore of the Swan River, it doesn't look very high. Indeed as hills go, it seems hardly worthy of the description. But as you can see in the two bottom images taken in the opposite direction in November last year it is indeed high enough to offer some pretty good views of the Swan River.

    Thankfully, the Wireless Hill bushland park has recovered very well form the devastating efforts of a firebug on 26 March 2008. But with the approaching summer it's fast drying out, so extra vigilance is required. See some of the photos taken the day after the 2008 fire at this link:
    Wireless Hill - fire aftermath 27 March 2008


    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



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    Tuesday, November 18th, 2014
    7:17 am
    Feral gastropods infest Alfred Cove


    Feral gastropods (Batillaria australis) at Alfred Cove 15 November 2014.

    The very low tides in the Swan River last week revealed an astonishing quantity of feral gastropods Batillaria australis on the exposed mudflats of Alfred Cove. They were first recorded in the estuary in the early 1950s. Their arrival is thought to have had human involvement because previously other populations were only found on the eastern seaboard of the continent. Commonly known as the Australian mud whelk, the overall population in the Swan-Canning River estuary is now believed to number in the billions. At least 3.6 billion, according to an online fact-sheet produced by the Swan River Trust. The snails act as an intermediate host for parasitic flatworms which live in sea birds, and in their spare time each day they move 450,000 cubic meters of sediment and filter 3 billion litres of water. Yes, per day. I kid you not. Read it for yourself at http://www.swanrivertrust.wa.gov.au/docs/fact-sheets/australian-mud-whelk-fact-sheet.pdf

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



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    Monday, November 17th, 2014
    8:12 am
    Low tides on the Swan River


    Gravity induced a very low tide on 14 November 2014.

    Gravity is the silent phenomena which permeates the entire Universe. It influences every aspect of our existence. It's completely invisible. We can only detect its presence by its effect on other things. (e.g. bathroom scales.) I'm unsure if anybody actually knows what it is. There are theories. We know that it involves mass, the greater the mass of an object, the greater is its gravitational attraction. The sun has the most powerful gravity in our solar system for a single object and it influences a significant pull on our planet. It easily effects the tides. So does the gravity of the Moon. And when these extraterrestrial objects become aligned, so their gravity seamlessly combines to exert an even greater pull on our planet. Such was the case last Friday when the photos above were taken of the Swan River from Point Waylen near Alfred Cove. The exposed sand banks are normally covered by water during low tide.

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



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    Sunday, November 16th, 2014
    6:40 am
    Doing our bit for the wading birds of Alfred Cove


    Removing broken glass yesterday during low tide at Alfred Cove.

    On Friday when there was an exceptionally low tide Jill and I took the opportunity to examine the normally covered north-western shore of Alfred Cove and were dismayed to discover a considerable quantity of broken glass distributed along the exposure. Presumably it was the archaeological evidence from the times decades ago when drunken crabbers and prawners celebrated their declining catches by smashing their beer and wine bottles. Anyway, we resolved to return at low water yesterday morning with some basic equipment and collect as much glass as possible. The task took us a couple of hours to complete. We used plastic trowels to probe beneath where we lifted large pieces. We also back tracked to review the exposed littoral for material we might have missed. In addition, broken glass was recovered from several elevated places on the flats above the high water mark. We tried to be methodical and thorough with our task. Sometimes we had to remove our gloves to pick up very small fragments. We'll revisit that shoreline again sometime in the future during another low tide to recheck. We feel that many of the sharp, jagged pieces we recovered for a more appropriate disposal yesterday probably posed a significant danger for the feet of wading birds.

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



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    Saturday, November 15th, 2014
    7:32 am
    An Osprey eating a fish near Alfred Cove


    An Osprey snacking on a large fish yesterday.

    The first two images in the above sequence were taken by me and the other four by my wife Jill. They are of an Osprey consuming a large fish at one of our favourite bird watching locations near Alfred Cove on the southern shore of the Swan River. When I took my first photo at top-left the fish was still flapping, but after a few minutes signs of life ceased as the bird began consuming it, tearing at its flesh, head-end first. I'm unsure of the fish species. We often see Ospreys along the river with quite large fish, never small ones. These sightings suggest to me the health of the river's inter-tidal zone is not too bad. This bird was one of a pair. Its mate was watching and calling nearby.

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



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    Friday, November 14th, 2014
    7:40 am
    My bare chested flashback to 1963

    Vladimir Putin was born in Leningrad in 1952 and Tony Abbott in London in 1957. Neither place known for producing bronzed surfers. Reputedly however, both men apparently like to be photographed bare chested as often as possible in order to tantalize themselves and their supporters. I was born an Aussie in 1945, so therefore I'm naturally older and wiser than either of them, especially when it comes to being seen by an adoring public bare chested and wearing budgie smugglers. Nowadays I choose to rely on such photographs taken in my youthful years, as for example the one below.


    Bare chested and wearing Speedos in the olden days.

    My wife Jill almost went into a swoon when we discovered the pic amongst some slides taken in 1963 by my late father. We knew it was me because he'd taken care to write my name on it. I suspect it was taken across the reef just south of the Cottesloe Beach, which is slightly north of Fremantle. In those days there weren't as many surfers as there are now. And as for great white sharks, I'd never heard of them in 1963. Nor had the term 'Budgie smugglers' been coined. They were simply called Speedos, and I had a couple of pairs - red and blue as I recall.

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



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    Thursday, November 13th, 2014
    8:03 am
    Armies of Santas sighted in the burbs


    Santa business is gaining momentum.

    Jill gets the credit for taking the pic on her iPhone of the army of jolly Santas and reindeers we sighted lurking in a corner of the giant Spotlight haberdashery in nearby Myaree yesterday. They are proof positive that Christmas is rushing towards us almost as fast as a flotilla of Russian warships. For some time our prime minister has been making garbled utterances that he is experiencing early indications of dementia. Worse than Ronald Raygun or Dubbya, our PM's shirtfront insults directed at Vlad the Russian president may result in us having to soon change our belief from capitalistic Santa Claus to the more orthodox Saint Nicholas. Instead of reindeers prancing across the sky, we'll have Pussy Riot dancing in the House of Reprobates in Canberra.

    But I digress. The real meaning of Christmas is still strong even with the Russian navy daring Mr Abbott to open his stupid gob just one more time. After Jill and I departed our meeting with the Spotlight Santas we were guests at the Myer department store's Santa soiree at Garden City for champagne and canapés. It was the first time I got to ride up an escalator clutching a glass of champers and a delicious sandwich. I get the credit for snapping the bottom-left pic of a group of friendly Christmas choral pixies from Sing Australia as they were spreading further cheer and goodwill throughout the store. http://www.singaustralia.com.au/Information-About-Sing-Australia

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



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    Wednesday, November 12th, 2014
    8:25 am
    Flashbacks of the Berlin Wall in 1969


    My glimpses of a divided Germany in 1969.

    "Ich bin ein Berliner!" So said US President John F. Kennedy in his famous 1963 speech when he was sucking up to the citizens of a then divided Germany. Earlier this week enthusiastic citizens of a unified Germany were celebrating the end of the Berlin Wall 25 years ago.

    I visited Berlin in 1969, which was when I took the above photos. The large image shows a section of the wall quite well. The picture at lower-left is of the Brandenburg Gate. The wall and Communist East Berlin can be seen just behind the columns. It was here in 1987 US President Ronald Reagan issued a challenge to the 'Commies' to tear down the wall and open the way towards capitalist prosperity.

    I remember East Berlin for its grayness. When I passed through the American controlled Checkpoint Charlie in 1969 to spend a day wandering about gawking at the GDR's urbane Stalinist architecture I was struck by the bleak grayness of it all. It was as I imagined a Communist state should look. Drab, seemingly poor and obviously suspicious.

    However, there were a couple of enjoyable memories. One was a huge cafeteria where East Berliners and touristic visitors like me could for a very reasonable price sit dawn to a large plate of steamed pork hock, sauerkraut and boiled potato. I liked that, but none of my family have been very enthusiastic when similar fare has been offered to them.

    Another interesting memory I captured on film was of an East German steam locomotive crossing a bridge. I was unsure if in that paranoid part of the world photographing a steam train had the potential to see me packed off to be tortured in some distant gulag, but as you can see in the bottom-right image, I took the shot anyway and got away with it.

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



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    Tuesday, November 11th, 2014
    8:39 am
    Lest we forget the survivors


    Alfred George Weaver 1897 - 1985.

    Today is Armistice Day, 11 November. At 11am this morning there will be a slight ripple of grief at war memorials around the nation as people pay tribute to the nation's war dead, and in particular those men and women who lost their lives while on active service during the great 1914-18 war, otherwise known as WW1. As I have occasionally mentioned before, my father was one of the survivors of that war. That's him in the three photos above. On the left he is in his WW1 uniform: 8602 WEAVER, Alfred George. Rank: Driver. Unit: 6th Army, Australian Field Artillery. Date enlisted: 17/9/1915. Date returned to Australia: 6/5/1919. He had many adventures and a a few close shaves. Unfazed by his first war he became a permanent soldier, surviving through WW2 to retire from the Army as a Warrant Officer at Fremantle Artillery Barracks in 1950. He then blended seamlessly into civilian life for the next 35 years without any of the disturbed psychological burdens that seem to have afflicted so many other military veterans. He was always a gentle, kind father to me and a sober, loving husband to my mother. However I do remember him being pretty angry with the Liberal Menzies government when they introduced conscription in 1965, which resulted me in going to Vietnam.

    The other two photos of my father were taken either in the late 1950s or early 1960s. Jill and I came across them yesterday when we were digitising some old 35mm slides. I was very pleased we rediscovered them. Some of my older children met him, but unfortunately this wasn't the case for those born after 1985. I know he would be very proud of all nine of them and their partners were he alive today, and be equally thrilled as we are by the news that he and my mother have two great-grandchildren on the way.

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



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    Monday, November 10th, 2014
    10:54 am
    Centenary of the battle between HMAS Sydney and SMS Emden

    Yesterday was the hundredth anniversary of the first naval battle of WW1 involving an Australian and German warship. It took place near the Cocos Islands northwest of Australia. I wrote the following brief summary of the event in 2006. Lest we forget:


    Seagulls at Bibra Lake yesterday.

    In early November 1914 the AIF convoy was making for Suez via Colombo in Ceylon (Sri Lanka). The naval strategists were aware of a German warship named Emden which had been creating havoc with Indian Ocean shipping. A course was set for the convoy to pass near the Cocos(Keeling) Islands group NW of Australia and hopefully avoid any action. The intelligence was wrong. Emden's Captain Karl von Müller had decided to quietly visit and wreck the telegraph station on Direction Island. A radio operator managed to get a brief coded radio message off just before the German landing party arrived. "Strange warship approaching - SOS." It was enough. HMAS Sydney 1 under Captain John Glossop was one of the convoy escorts. It immediately changed course to investigate. Spoiling for action, the Japanese battle cruiser Ibuki started to follow, but was ordered back on station with the convoy.

    Von Müller was unaware of either the convoy, or the SOS. He later said that if he had been, he would have tried to sail into the midst of the fleet and inflict what damage he could. In the ensuing battle on the morning of 9 November Emden scored the first hits on Sydney and knocked out its primary gun directing system. Sydney was able to manoeuvre out of range and proceeded to destroy the German vessel with its larger guns. Emden was eventually run into the shallows of North Keeling Island and at the urging of Captain Glossop, Von Müller surrendered. Glossop then radioed a famous message, "Emden beached and done for."

    During the hundred minute engagement the German warship suffered about 130 fatalities - Sydney four. A German ship named Buresk then turned up with coal for Emden This was unfortunate timing. Sydney gave chase, but the crew quickly scuttled their ship and surrendered Captain Glossop treated his captives in a overtly chivalrous manner. When Sydney pulled into Colombo, such was his alleged deference for the enemy captain and crew that the Australian soldiers watching from the waiting convoy were forbidden to cheer.

    One of the great escape stories of WW1 was still unfolding. The original shore party from Emden hadn't been able to return to their ship when Sydney arrived. They later managed to escape in a small hijacked schooner. After a remarkable sequence of adventures they eventually reached Germany.

    The submarine cable from the Cocos (Keeling) Islands came ashore at Mosman Park, slightly north of Fremantle. If you look carefully in the shallows and slope beneath the Vlamingh memorial you can still find some remnants. Apparently some traces of the beached Emden can still be viewed at the battle scene. (Originally written in 2006 by Dr Paul Weaver.)

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



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    Sunday, November 9th, 2014
    4:42 am
    The 2014 Geranium & Pelargonium Society sale

    Yesterday morning was set aside for the annual sale of plants and cuttings from the local Girl Guides Hall by the Western Australian Geranium & Pelargonium Society. It's a traditional fundraiser for the Society through a modest entry fee, plus the sale of cuttings donated from members private collections, and the renting of tables to members who have grown potted specimens to sell for their own profit. Jill and I donated a cardboard boxful of about 20 cuttings, each with a flower attached so buyers knew what they were getting. Three large tables were set aside for hundreds of similarly donated cuttings which sold for $2 each. Jill also helped with the sale of the other members' potted plants. That's her standing behind one of the assortments ready for the opening rush. There were many beautiful varieties on the tables not easily available from other sources.

    And what a rush it was. The sale was scheduled to operate from 10am 'til noon. As usual there was a queue of eager buyers waiting for the gate to open at ten. When it did they were so eager that everything was pretty well sold within the first half hour. The sale could probably be described as a roaring success. Bad luck for anyone who arrived late.


    Jill was one of the volunteer helpers yesterday.

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



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    Saturday, November 8th, 2014
    7:06 am
    Wisdom tooth business

    It was a longish day yesterday for my wife Jill and especially our youngest daughter Kylie whom kept an appointment to have her four wisdom teeth surgically extracted. The dental saga began months ago during a routine checkup and x-ray by our family dentist. He suggested that her teeth were probably going to cause crowding problems in the future and referred her to a specialist wisdom tooth removalist and fixer of things like famous AFL footballers' broken jaws. There was a month long wait for the initial consultation and then a similar period for the hospital appointment yesterday. The same specialist surgeon had done several of our children previously, each at a cost of about fifteen hundred bucks, which had to be paid up front a week before the procedure. Mind you, I'm not complaining because he is apparently one of the best in his field, and the operation involves a surgical team and general anaesthesia. Our HBF health insurance helped to cover these other ancillary costs.


    Our youngest daughter at Haloween last week.

    Our daughter went to her busy floristry job yesterday until lunchtime, but of course there was no lunch for her. Jill took her to the hospital for her mid-afternoon admission. I kept out of the way by staying home and minding the cats and dog. Everything went according to plan and my wife kept me updated via our iPhones. The dynamic duo arrived home about 8:15pm last night with Kylie's face in an icepack. She was relatively cheerful and said she felt like a chipmunk, presumably because of her swollen face. She'll be on antibiotics and pain killers for the next few days.

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



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    Friday, November 7th, 2014
    7:44 am
    Steam train flashback to Leighton Beach in 1963


    My Leighton steam engine pic from 1963

    I was only 17 when I took the above photo of a steam loco adjacent to Leighton Beach in mid-1963. It was traveling south on the Fremantle line, but that may not have been its destination. In those days there was a marshaling yard a little further on also some spur lines serving various light industries and grain silos in North Fremantle, plus in those pre-shipping container times cargo was routinely loaded on trains alongside the North Wharf at Fremantle Harbour. Unfortunately I haven't been able to clearly discern the number or name plate on the side of the engine, but I feel pretty sure there are steam train experts in the community who will have no trouble with the identification. Notice there were no fences trackside. Not so nowadays. In the background is the stony Mosman Park/Leighton hill. In those days it was still occupied by the Australian Army. I remember when occasionally artillery shells were fired over the rail line from camouflaged gun emplacements to ocean targets behind where I took the photo. The Army vacated the hill in 1963, the same year this photo was taken. The gun emplacements and tunnels beneath the hill are now part of a military museum run by volunteers on weekends.

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



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    Thursday, November 6th, 2014
    7:20 am
    Creatures thinking about food on a late afternoon


    Hungry creatures in our garden late yesterday

    Late in the afternoons I often have a general idea what I can write about the next morning for my daily dose of Fremantlebiz. Yesterday my mind was totally blank until 4.45pm when I had the thought of catching for posterity some of the hungry creatures lurking around our garden thinking about food. The catalyst for this idea was the smell of what was promising to be a delicious vegetable lasagna Jill was cooking in the kitchen. I discovered a Pink and grey galah nibbling grass seeds on the street verge and a Rainbow lorikeet tucking into our mulberries. The rest of the bird population was somewhere else. The White cabbage butterfly was fresh out of cabbages, and seemed to have settled on one of our roses as a resting place for the coming night. Other insects had made themselves very scarce when these images were taken, and I still had three more frames to fill. Then two of our cats Max and Bubbles drifted into my field of view, as did our Cocker spaniel Millie. I know these three pets were thinking about food, because they always are in the late afternoons. By 5pm I had my six images and Jill was calling that lasagna was ready. It was indeed delicious.

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



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    Wednesday, November 5th, 2014
    7:17 am
    Bonfire night excitement in the nanny state

    Today is 5 November, a date which used to be one of the most exciting of the year when I was a kid because in the 1950s we could buy as many fireworks as we could afford and burn effigies of the English terrorist bomber Guy Fawkes on huge pyres we called bonfires. Both activities have long been banned in our nanny state because too many kids got accidentally injured in the quest for fun. Nowadays the most excitement we can expect on 5 November is something like the scarlet flower I discovered this morning on a potted cactussy thingo perched atop a wall in our back garden.


    Red cactussy thingo in flower provides our Bonfire night excitement.

    The plant was one we found on a street verge throwout years ago. We bought a new pot for it and stuck up on the pier where it has been doing its own thing ever since. The flowers only last a few days, but there are several others in varius stages of development which we expect will open during this month.

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



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    Tuesday, November 4th, 2014
    6:51 am
    Garden excitement on Melbourne Cup Day, 2014


    Eager anticipation for today's Melbourne Cup.

    By tradition the first Tuesday in November is Melbourne Cup Day. The day when the bogans of Australia unite in their efforts to make all the bookies in this fair land girt by sea as rich as possible. Also by tradition there will be a family sweep in this household where everyone's, even our kids who have left home, will have their names matched to one of the horses in the great race in the hope of winning a great prize, which if format of past Cup winnings is anything to go by, will in all likelihood be a Mars Bar.

    There has been palpable excitement in our garden during the lead-up to today. Our two hens Bert and Ernie have been pacing back and forth in their chook run thinking about nothing else for the past week, and a gang of Rainbow Lorikeets have been getting charged up for the big event with daily practice visitations to the mulberry tree in our front garden. More polite have been the Christmas lilies in bloom next to our letter box. The've been tacitly reminding us that Christmas is next month, by which time everyone except the connections will have forgotten the name of the nag which wins today's big race.

    © MMXIV Paul R. Weaver.

    COMMENTS: Because of an ongoing problem with spammers, all comments are now screened and can only be made by friended LiveJournal users. Alternatively, email me direct.


    Click here to email the Fremantlebiz experience to a friend.

    RSS feed.

    Click here to browse through the collection of free downloadable PDF versions of my many illustrated Rottnest Island essays.

    Click here to visit 'dogandcatwatcher', my YouTube website.

    Original still photographs are stored online in a cache at my Panoramio  website or my Picasa site.  Most of them have a brief description and a link back to a relevant essay.  Images on Panoramio can usually be enlarged several times by clicking them.

    I have some free MP3 downloads of natural sounds available online. Click here.

    About the writer

    Check out each month's subject index on the Calendar Page for all my "common-man" monologues about survival in 21st century Australia – plus a little history occasionally.  An original essay is added most days as part of an undertaking to write at least several million words. Zzzzzzzz!



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